Avoiding Feedback

Posted on October 13 2020

Avoiding Feedback

Preventing feedback from your karaoke system isn't too difficult. First, what is feedback? It's exactly what it sounds like; its when sound from your speakers is being picked up by your microphone in a constant loop. Feedback sounds like a loud, sharp screech you hear out of speakers that can cause your ears to ring for several minutes and at worse, potentially deafen you. Depending on how over tuned the sound settings are, the feed back can gradually build up or hit you all at once. The quickest way to cut-off the feedback is to turn off the microphones.

Across 35+ years of selling karaoke equipment, we've picked up on recurring issues that often causes feedback.

Shelf speakers placed on or near the floor is one such offender.

The closer your shelf speakers are to the floor, the more likely feed back will occur. It is due to sound bouncing on tiled floor, glass tables, or even windows that go right back into the microphone. Shelf speakers are meant to be set up overheard for optimal sound coverage and to avoid direct contact with large surface areas. We recommend speaker stands if shelf space is not readily available or if wall mounting your speakers isn't an option. Wall mounting can be a convenient solution, but be sure to have someone who can help you secure them to your wall correctly. 

Floor standing (tower) speakers such as Cerwin Vega and JBL speakers can still be raised from the ground by placing a pedestal underneath them.

Another common cause of feedback would be over-adjusting the Echo effects. Echo adjustment needs a degree of moderation for both good sound, and clear audio. If you're running into issues, turn down all of the echo, then slowly tune it back to your liking while testing the audio with your microphone. If you start hearing feedback, try reducing the highs and echo repeat settings.

The next major suspect  is an over-tuned Treble or HI. HI is the setting that can tune your voice to be more crisp and clear. Too much treble will backfire in the form of a sharp feedback. Hi adjustments should be set to the midway point by default. It can be adjusted a little less or a little more, but ideally you never want the HI to be set too high.

If nothing seems to help, you could consider adding a feedback reducer to your system. We currently carry the SHURE DFR22, a professional feedback reducer, for your convenience! 

 

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